15 Reasons Why Highly Intelligent People Need So Much Alone Time

15 Reasons Why Highly Intelligent People Need So Much Alone Time

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Highly intelligent people represent an ideal blend of book learning, common sense, and life experience. This combination opens your mind to the beautiful curiosities of the Universe.

Your intelligent side can aptly learn facts and processes from books and other media. Plus, you gain knowledge from listening to more experienced people and following their lead. Now, it’s up to you to use wisdom to put your ability to work.

Fifteen Reasons Why Smart People Need So Much Alone Time

When you study for a test, you usually do it in a quiet space by yourself. You’re able to concentrate and focus on the material. This lone environment becomes a place of comfort and inspiration for you.

Do you do your best thinking in a solitary space? The good news is that many other intelligent people feel the same way. Here are some reasons why you might need solitude if you’re among the smart.

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1. Intelligent People Value Productivity

Most intelligent folks have a stellar work ethic. They often find the most satisfaction and validation from their accomplishments. The few in their tight-knit circle probably describe them as workaholics who don’t know how to relax.

It’s not that they don’t carve out some free time. When not working, brilliant people may immerse themselves in exercise, reading, writing, and other solitary activities. Even their leisure time involves thinking of working harder and more efficiently.

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2. They Often Have a Different Perspective

Intelligence is inherently linked with curiosity, and it’s the driving force behind them. They devote countless hours to reflection and observation. In doing so, they often gain a different perspective of the world than others.

They may feel more connected to themselves and the Universe when they’re alone. Plus, those who think differently become the greatest inventors and creative geniuses. Their unique perception helps them discover solutions that aren’t obvious to the average person.

3. They Use Solitude for Planning

Intelligent people aren’t usually those who do things on the fly. They are analytical to the core and like to crunch the numbers. They often prefer to be alone in their own space to make plans and goals.

While they’re less likely to be spontaneous, smart folks aren’t afraid to buck conventional wisdom. They like for each step to be part of their plan. If they are working with a group, they are excellent organizers.

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4. Highly Intelligent People Are Comfortable Being Different

Intelligent people often think differently than the crowd. Whether others call them loners, eccentric, or even peculiar, they are comfortable with themselves. Their differences in personality and thought patterns serve their ambitions and limitless curiosity.

Their quirks may sometimes encourage them to be alone. They bask in the silence and have no one to answer to them. For these folks, solitude and oddness are usual.

They’ll never be satisfied being a cookie-cutter person. They have their way of thinking, and they’re okay with it. This difference may be what drives them to learn more.

5. They Spend Time Cultivating Creativity

In his article published by The Great Courses Daily, Dr. Don Lincoln debates the right-brain/left-brain hypothesis. Although the right-brain does control creativity and the left-brain analytics, there is not an either/or, explains Lincoln. So, it’s entirely possible that a gifted genius can also be sensitive and creative, and a creative person can be analytical savvy.

It stands to reason that intelligent people can appreciate their creativity, whether art or academics. To them, the patterns of a complex algebraic equation can be inspiring and beautiful. However, many intelligent people are artists, writers, dancers, and actors.

6. Solitude Helps Intelligent People Appreciate Others Better

It’s an inaccurate generalization to assume that all intelligent people are hermits. In fact, most of them genuinely care for people and are some of the world’s greatest philanthropists. However, their time alone may give them a greater appreciation for others.

Since they usually don’t socialize with big groups often, they have more quality time to spend with the precious few in their circle. Their periods of solitude offer them more interesting subjects to discuss with others. Plus, they often take inspiration from their friends and loved ones.

7. They Don’t Seek Social Validation

No matter how competent a person is, validation is a basic human need. It’s just as crucial as socialization and acceptance. The difference is that most intelligent people don’t seek it from everyone they meet.

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Their close circle of friends provides all the validation they need. Smart folks usually have enough self-confidence to disregard negative opinions. They’re not desperate for acceptance, and they couldn’t care less if people like them or not.

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8. They Spend a Lot of Time Reading

Perhaps one of the things that best boost intellect is reading. Scientific observation agrees with this theory, says an article published by Advances in Child Development and Behavior. According to the report, reading builds vocabulary, verbal skills, and general knowledge.

Intelligent people are usually avid readers, and they eagerly glean knowledge from books. Most visitors choose a solitary table or nook for reading, even in a crowded library. Smart people who read a lot can also be better writers in business or pleasure.

9. They Know Who Their Friends Are

Some people have numerous acquaintances but can’t identify true friends. Intelligent social butterflies can be effervescent in a group but still realize who has their backs. They don’t flit from gathering to gathering, hoping to build up their buddy lists on social media.

10. They’re Not Afraid of Missing Out

In his article published by Psychology Today, Dr. Nick Hobson discusses the psychological effect of FOMO, which is the fear of missing out. It’s that unsettling feeling a person has that they’re missing out on something if they aren’t there. For example, they regret going to a movie when they could have attended a party.

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This uncomfortable sensation can affect people regardless of their intelligence. However, many intelligent individuals strive to live in the present. They find purpose in what they are doing at the moment. Mindful living gives them greater fulfillment and satisfaction.

They often hone their mindfulness skills with meditation, breathing, and exercise. Many keep journals about their experiences, thoughts, and feelings. They cherish the now rather than regret what could have been or bad decisions.

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